Blak History Month: WATCH

Blak History Month, which takes place over the month of July, has been celebrated in Australia since 2008. It is a people’s movement that seeks to be a portal for positive action by, for and about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. A month of celebration and pride for Australia’s Indigenous histories and cultures of which are part of the oldest living continuous culture in the world.  

This Blak History Month, we’re celebrating by sharing some of our favourite resources – from things to watch, read and listen, to places to shop and where you can support through donating, here and across social media.

Below is a collection of videos, TV and films that are all important watching. These videos and films centre the voices and stories of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, from the incredible artistry that is the Bangarra Dance Theatre, to the brilliant and powerful takeover of Get Krack!n by Miranda Tapsell and Nakkiah Lui, to informative and insightful discussions with activists like Amrita Hepi.

While some might be hard to find or not yet released (like The Australian Dream), note them down, seek them out and embrace them when they are released. We recommend watching them all and we’d love for you to share your favourites with us on social media too – you’ll find us @theequalityinstitute

It’s important to acknowledge that we live on stolen lands here in Australia. Sovereignty was never ceded, nor has a treaty been made. If you’d like to learn more about how to be an ally, click here, and to learn more about Blak History Month, visit the website here.  

Is our national anthem for everyone? Musician Briggs talks us through the anthem & how it affects and resonates with First Nations people.

Top End Wedding: in cinemas May 2.

From the makers of The Sapphires, TOP END WEDDING is a celebration of love, family and belonging, set against the spectacular natural beauty of the Northern Territory. Starring Miranda Tapsell.

You Can’t Ask That : Indigenous episode  Insightful, irreverent, moving and unpredictable, this episode sets the record straight about what it's really like to be an Indigenous Australian.

You Can’t Ask That: Indigenous episode

Insightful, irreverent, moving and unpredictable, this episode sets the record straight about what it's really like to be an Indigenous Australian.

Amrita Hepi - Australia, I love you. But…

Amrita Hepi is an emerging independent choreographer and performance artist descending from the Ngapuhi tribe in Northern New Zealand and the Bundjulung people in northern New South Wales, Australia. She is focused on making work that explores the identity of the divine other, and how movement has the capacity to be alchemically sacred.

Miranda Tapsell & Nakkiah Lui take over  Get Krack!n   Miranda Tapsell and Nakkiah Lui stop by for a khat to cross-promote their show The Blynde Spot, but when the Kates have to leave suddenly the guests are left to host the leaky, rudderless show that is Get Krack!n.

Miranda Tapsell & Nakkiah Lui take over Get Krack!n

Miranda Tapsell and Nakkiah Lui stop by for a khat to cross-promote their show The Blynde Spot, but when the Kates have to leave suddenly the guests are left to host the leaky, rudderless show that is Get Krack!n.

John Pilger’s 1999 documentary: Welcome To Australia.

Welcome To Australia demonstrates the injustices endured by Aboriginal Australian sportsmen and women who were, until recently, denied a place on Australia's olympic teams.

Bangarra Dance Theatre: 30 years of sixty five thousand.

Bangarra: 30 years of sixty five thousand is Bangarra Dance Theatre’s landmark 30th anniversary season. This diverse program of three contemporary works displays the passionate storytelling, rich artistry and deep community connections that have made Bangarra the premier Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander performing arts company in Australia.

First Australians  tv series  First Australians chronicles the birth of contemporary Australia as never told before, from the perspective of its first people.

First Australians tv series

First Australians chronicles the birth of contemporary Australia as never told before, from the perspective of its first people.

Djuki Mala

Direct from Elcho Island, Djuki Mala (Djuki meaning ‘bird’ with a Yolngu accent and Mala meaning ‘mob’) perform a high-energy and stunning fusion of traditional Indigenous culture, contemporary dance and storytelling.

Since their 2007 clip of ‘Zorba the Greek’ went viral, they’ve been consistently thrilling audiences with reinterpretations of popular culture and traditional dances in a way that juxtaposes contemporary Yolngu culture.

The Australian Dream: in cinemas August 22

From shy country kid to two-time Brownlow medallist and Australian of the Year, Goodes is an inspiration to many. The footy field was where he thrived; the only place where the colour of his skin was irrelevant. Goodes’ world fell apart when he became the target of racial abuse during a game, which spiralled into public backlash against him. He spoke out about racism when Australia was not ready to hear the ugly truth, retiring quietly from AFL heartbroken.

Sweet Country (2017)

The latest film from Warwick Thornton. Inspired by real events, Sweet Country is a period western set in 1929 in the outback of the Northern Territory, Australia.

She Who Must Be Loved is a celebration of the life and work of the trailblazing Alfreda Glynn, a history-maker, mother, and a central figure in Indigenous filmmaking from the heart of the country. 'Freda' Glynn was born on a remote cattle station north of Alice Springs in 1939.

The Final Quarter (2019)

Cheers turned to boos in the final years of AFL champion footballer Adam Goodes' career when he publicly called out racism. This impassioned film tracks Australia's heated response.

The Nightingale: in cinemas August 2.

THE NIGHTINGALE is a meditation on the consequences of violence and the price of seeking vengeance. Set during the colonisation of Australia in 1825, the film follows Clare (AISLING FRANCIOSI), a 21-year-old Irish convict.